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LifeCare Alliance

DC Coordinators at Grab and Go

Funding from the League of Women Voters Nourishes the Human Spirit

By | Carrie's Cafe, Featured News

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, over 2 billion people do not have regular access to safe, nutritious and sufficient food.

One of the ways LifeCare Alliance helps to alleviate the challenges of access to food is through our congregate dining centers. Due to COVID-19, this program is currently offered with Grab-and-Go meals at senior residences in Franklin County and a drive-thru service at our signature dining center, Carrie’s Café. In addition to these models of meal distributions, Grab-and-Go events were established throughout the warmer weather months to enrich programming and provide education about voting procedures for the upcoming election.

Thanks to funding from the League of Women Voters, these events have been enhanced through advertising, music, desserts, games, prizes, signs, stickers, voter absentee applications, voter education flyers, and more. This helps to reach more individuals with voter education that is still safe for clients, some of who are the most vulnerable to the coronavirus.

What better way to celebrate a supporter of our nutrition programs than on World Food Day! Every year on October 16, World Food Day brings to light the concerns of food security, with this year’s theme being Grow, Nourish, Sustain, Together.  We are sincerely appreciative to funders like the League of Women Voters who help us Nourish the Human Spirit!

-By Stephanie Rowe Bencic, LifeCare Alliance

Learn more

Visit LifeCare Alliance’s Carrie’s Cafe page to learn more about the Agency’s no-cost drive-through meals for seniors!

Remember to Vote on or before November 3,2020.
Logan in a football pose

Navigating the Pendulum Between Confidence and Cockiness

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

How are you building confidence in your children?

I think this is an ever-evolving question, at least for me. As parents we want our children to believe in themselves, but there is a fine line between confidence and cockiness. I am working intentionally to keep that teeter totter balanced with my kids.

Logan has always been a pretty confident kid. He will enter any group situation and can confidently join right in. He will immediately call you a friend and not even know your name But, then there is the “know-it-all” side to Logan. The pendulum has swung far on the cocky side when it comes to how he shares about video games, sports, and pretty much anything you are talking about, he will feel sure that he knows more than you if he’s seen one YouTube video on the subject. And I genuinely don’t believe he intentionally is trying to be better than anyone. He is a teacher at heart. Right now, his teaching comes across more as telling. Again, a fine line.

Then there is the confidence he has in taking command of his diabetes. Where I am so proud of him for being vocal about how he is feeling with his teachers and friends at school, I have also seen him swing towards taking advantage of the freedom to come and go to the clinic as needed and seems to be taking a few too many trips “just to check.” Thankfully, a new Dexcom helps curb that this year.

Don’t get me wrong, I want him to be sure of himself, but I have learned over the years that the best way to gain trust and credibility with people is to first listen to understand. To listen to understand requires you to ask questions. This is the learning moment I am in with Logan right now. How the best teachers are the ones who put learning first. Its not about how much you know, but how big your desire is to learn.

I heard John Maxwell speak recently (virtually of course) and he restated a message in a way that we have heard a million times: “Your talk talks. Your walk walks. But your walk talks louder than your talk talks.” While I can’t say that ten times fast, or even one time fast, it does remind me that the best way I can teach Logan — and his sister and anyone I encounter — is to walk my talk. To not just tell him what he should do, but I want to display the behavior for him. For everyone I encounter in my life, I want them to see my teaching through my actions. The only way to teach love is to be love. The old adage of “do as I say, not as I do” is no longer a viable message for sustainable change.

This is not an overnight switch to flip, and one day he is going to wake up and know exactly how to maintain the perfect balance of confident versus cocky. I’m 37 years old and I am still figuring it out. And that’s the point! The point is to be intentional. To own it when I’ve gone too far towards cocky, and to commit to do it differently the next time. To celebrate him when I see him excel with confidence and to ask questions when it comes across as cocky.

We are all just figuring it out. The world isn’t slowing down for us to teach just this one lesson. It throws in things like pandemics, and virtual school, and distrust, and elections, and wildfires and all these other opportunities to practice. And we are in the situation of having the added pressure and expectation of raising responsible children who can take command of their health and wellness in a way that sometimes seems unfair. But how we engage with our children now is helping build their future. So how are you playing a part in their confident future?

About

Logan poses on his first day of school

This blog post is PART EIGHT of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Members of the Columbus Chamber of Commerce volunteer during the Rally for Recovery

Rally for Recovery Gives Meals-on-Wheels Volunteers a Boost

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels, Volunteers

LifeCare Alliance received a welcome boost to its volunteer efforts during the United Way of Central Ohio’s Rally for Recovery Campaign.

During the week of Sept. 28, 2020, the UWCO awarded funds to local organizations to encourage new volunteers to complete a project that creates positive change within the community. LifeCare Alliance’s programs have been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, so the Agency requested and was awarded a microgrant to help recruit volunteers to deliver Meals-on-Wheels.

Many of our neighbor seniors are still not able to go to the grocery store or are afraid to go out in public where they might encounter a crowd. In addition, those who normally have assistance from a family member or friend often cannot be visited during this time because of their particular vulnerability to COVID-19. As a result, since March 1, the demand for Meals-on-Wheels has increased by 65%. The Agency anticipates this need to continue, and will accept all those in need who qualify. By providing our nutritionally balanced meals to our senior and medically challenged neighbors, we will help keep them safe.

With public health concerns forcing the closure of congregate dining, senior centers, and senior daycare facilities, those who relied on these centers for their nutritional needs are turning to home-delivered meals to provide their nutrition. Many seniors and medically challenged individuals are unable to prepare and cook meals, and need a complete, ready to eat, home-delivered meal.

LifeCare Alliance used the award to purchase Speedway fuel gift cards to help defray the cost of gas during a volunteer’s Meals-on-Wheels shift. This was a great help in recruiting new volunteers as the Agency isn’t able to provide this perk to volunteers on a regular basis. The Agency is particularly appreciative of the funding from the United Way because it was able to offer a special thank you to Rally for Recovery volunteers.

As a result of this special funding and targeted recruitment, the Agency was able to attract 20 new volunteers during Rally for Recovery, including many from the Columbus Chamber of Commerce. These volunteers spent a total of 60 hours delivering 15 Meals-on-Wheels routes over the course of the Rally for Recovery week, distributing an estimated 250 meals to our senior clients! With their assistance, we were able to ensure that all routes were delivered and our seniors got the hot, nutritious meals they need.

The Agency plans to continue nurturing the relationships with these volunteers. With hope, many will be interested and available to become regular volunteers or even “adopt” a route. The Agency has the largest Adopt-A-Route program in the country (more than 100 companies participate), giving employees the opportunity to deliver Meals-on-Wheels during their lunch break. Each meal route delivered by a volunteer instead of a paid driver saves the Agency $12,000 annually.

Thanks so much to the United Way of Central Ohio for their commitment to volunteer recruitment!

-By Crystal Kurzen, Grants Manager, LifeCare Alliance

Learn more

Visit LifeCare Alliance’s Volunteer page to learn more about different ways to get involved and Nourish the Human Spirit!

Above:

Members of the Columbus Chamber of Commerce volunteering for Meals-on-Wheels during the Rally for Recovery.

SWACO logo

LifeCare Alliance, SWACO Partner to Reduce Waste and Improve Recycling and Composting

By | Press Releases

Columbus, OH – LifeCare Alliance, one of the oldest and largest organizations in central Ohio, best known as the leading provider of Meals-on-Wheels, is pleased to announce we have been awarded a Community Waste Reduction Grant through SWACO’s competitive grant program for the purchase of containers that align with current best management practices for recycling. With SWACO’s support, LifeCare Alliance will be able to provide new recycling stations in all three of our buildings to reinforce the importance of waste diversion for the long-term sustainability of our community.

In 2020, SWACO awarded $194,000 in competitive grant funding to fifteen community projects.

“SWACO’s grants support unique and innovative projects throughout Franklin County as a way to improve the local waste stream by increasing diversion,” said Hanna Greer-Brown, SWACO’s communications manager. “We applaud the work of LifeCare Alliance to prioritize sustainability and join our efforts to reach a 75% diversion goal by 2032.”

About LifeCare Alliance

Formed in 1898, LifeCare Alliance provides a comprehensive array of health and nutrition services to older adults and individuals living with a medical challenge or disability in central Ohio—keeping them safe, independent, and in their own homes, where they want to be! LifeCare Alliance operates a national model for its programs, leading in volunteer engagement, effective mergers, and social entrepreneurship. A not-for-profit organization, the Agency’s mission is to lead the community in identifying and delivering health and nutrition services to meet the community’s changing needs.

LifeCare Alliance Among Grantees Receiving COVID-19 and Social Justice Support From KeyBank

By | Featured News, Press Releases

COLUMBUS, Ohio, Oct. 1, 2020 – KeyBank has announced $300,000 in KeyBank Foundation grants in the third quarter to local nonprofits across Central and Southwestern Ohio for COVID-19 relief and social justice efforts.  The funding provides $240,000 in grants for COVID-related support to local organizations serving our community’s most vulnerable populations across Key’s markets in greater Columbus, Cincinnati and Dayton. It also includes $60,000 directed toward grassroots racial equity and social justice initiatives. The grants are incremental to Key’s substantial ongoing community support to the region as directed through the bank’s five-year, $16.5 billion National Community Benefits Plan.

“KeyBank’s purpose is to help our clients and our communities thrive. That is true in good times and in challenging times,” said Corporate Responsibility Officer Stacy Thompson. “COVID-19 hasn’t revealed new issues; rather it has shown us the depths of issues we continue to work to address with our community partners, and just how much further we have to go.” Thompson went on to explain that along with committing additional funds at the beginning of the pandemic, Key shifted some of its 2020 planned philanthropic resources to meet more immediate needs.  “We realized early on that many of our community partners needed to pivot in response to the pandemic’s impact on their vulnerable populations, so we worked with them to reallocate our planned support to help them.”

Organizations receiving COVID-19 relief support from KeyBank Foundation are:

“Not only has KeyBank generously contributed financially, but they have also provided critical volunteer support by allowing associates to deliver Meals-on-Wheels as one of our Adopt-a-Route partners. Thanks to support like theirs, we continue to serve all eligible clients in need.”
-Charles W. Gehring,
President & CEO,
LifeCare Alliance

Columbus & Central Ohio

  • Columbus Foundation
  • Central Ohio United Way
  • Richland County United Way
  • YWCA Columbus
  • Columbus Urban League
  • LifeCare Alliance Meals-on-Wheels
  • Per Scholas – Columbus
  • Move to Prosper

Dayton

  • Dayton Foundation
  • United Way of Dayton
  • Wesley Community Center
  • Miami Valley Foodbank
  • Miami Valley Fair Housing Center

Cincinnati

  • Cincinnati United Way
  • YWCA Cincinnati
  • Cincinnati Youth Collaborative
  • Freestore Foodbank
  • YMCA of Greater Cincinnati

“Per Scholas Columbus appreciates the support of KeyBank as we moved to remote training as a result of COVID-19,” said Managing Director, Toni Cunningham.  “Workforce training is critical to getting our community back to work during these challenging times. KeyBank’s investment supports continuation of our high impact technology training through our remote classrooms, as well as to ensure that no learner is turned away due to lack of equipment or access to broadband services.”

LifeCare Alliance President & CEO Chuck Gehring is also grateful for KeyBank’s partnership. “Not only has KeyBank generously contributed financially, but they have also provided critical volunteer support by allowing associates to deliver Meals-on-Wheels as one of our Adopt-a-Route partners,” he said. “Thanks to support like theirs, we continue to serve all eligible clients in need.”

As a company recognized for its commitment to and advancement of diversity, equity, and inclusion practices, KeyBank reaffirms its strong stand for social justice and racial equity with social change grants in all its markets, and has committed to a comprehensive community response plan to accelerate outcomes and create meaningful and lasting advancement toward racial equity and social justice across its footprint.

Local organizations receiving grants from KeyBank Foundation to support racial equity and social justice initiatives are:

Columbus & Central Ohio

  • The Center for Employment Opportunities (C.E.O)
  • Ohio Black Expo
  • Columbus Urban League
  • UNCF Columbus

Dayton

  • YWCA Dayton
  • West Dayton Caravan (Dayton Scholars Program)
  • Neighborhoods Over Politics
  • Dayton Young Black Professionals
  • McKinley UM Church (John Moore Center)

Cincinnati

  • The Center for Employment Opportunities (C.E.O)
  • DAD Initiative
  • Urban League of Greater SW Ohio

“C.E.O. Columbus would like to extend our sincerest appreciation to our newest partner, KeyBank, for awarding us the Social Justice and Equity grant,” said Program Director Teresa Gary.  “This mission-aligned funding will help to support our local economic opportunity work, providing participants with ancillary resources to participate in gainful employment skills training that will elevate both their hiring and salary potential.  We are so grateful for partners like KeyBank who make it possible for communities of color to thrive on their journey to excellence.”

In addition to the above grants, KeyBank teammates donated more than $2 million through KeyBank Foundation’s 2:1 Response Employee Matching Gifts program, supporting COVID-19 relief and social change efforts through more than 1,200 nonprofits across the country, including many in Central and Southwestern Ohio.  KeyBank’s employees also participated in the bank’s Virtual Neighbor’s Make a Difference initiative during the months of June and July, which, due to the pandemic, replaced the bank’s traditional annual day of caring with volunteering projects with non-profits that employees completed remotely.

“I am deeply proud of KeyBank’s community spirit and the way our teammates have come together to support our clients and our community,” said KeyBank Market President Melissa Ingwersen.  “Key’s long and strong history of support has helped our customers and communities prevail through many challenging times, and together we will get through today’s challenges as well.”

About KeyBank Foundation
KeyBank Foundation serves to fulfill KeyBank’s purpose to help clients and communities thrive, and its mission is to support organizations and programs that prepare people for thriving futures.  The Foundation’s mission is advanced through three funding priorities – neighbors, education, and workforce – and through community service. To provide meaningful philanthropy that transforms lives, KeyBank Foundation listens carefully to understand the unique characteristics and needs of its communities and then backs solutions with targeted philanthropic investments. KeyBank Foundation is a nonprofit charitable foundation, funded by KeyCorp.
About KeyCorp
KeyCorp’s roots trace back 190 years to Albany, New York. Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, Key is one of the nation’s largest bank-based financial services companies, with assets of approximately $171.2 billion at June 30, 2020.  Key provides deposit, lending, cash management, and investment services to individuals and businesses in 15 states under the name KeyBank National Association through a network of more than 1,000 branches and approximately 1,400 ATMs. Key also provides a broad range of sophisticated corporate and investment banking products, such as merger and acquisition advice, public and private debt and equity, syndications and derivatives to middle market companies in selected industries throughout the United States under the KeyBanc Capital Markets trade name. For more information, visit https://www.key.com/. KeyBank is Member FDIC.
Census sign encouraging people to complete the 2020 census.

Columbus Counts 2020 Census Grant Enhances Grab-and-Go and Drive-Thru Services at LifeCare Alliance!

By | Carrie's Cafe, Featured News
In early 2020, LifeCare Alliance received a grant from the City of Columbus—Columbus Counts 2020 to help raise awareness among our clients about the importance of filling out the Census. To use this funding, we had to radically pivot when COVID-19 struck. Since our congregate dining centers closed on March 16, 2020, and are still not open, we had to think of a different way to reach the Hard-to-Count (HTC) populations that we normally serve through in-person dining and large events.

As a result of some of the new COVID-19 protocols, it took us some time to relaunch our congregate meal program and assess how to do it safely for all parties involved. Leah Bunck, MSW, Director of Congregate Dining at LifeCare Alliance, discussed the challenges of relaunching the program: “Many of our clients do not drive, which means we had to figure out the best way to bring the meals and programming to them. Partnering with senior apartment buildings throughout Franklin County has worked very well.”

In addition, converting our signature dining center, Carrie’s Cafe, into a drive-thru has worked as a great alternative for clients that can drive. Once we realized that we could do a “Grab-and-Go” model at senior residences as well as a restaurant-style drive-thru to continue to provide meals to our seniors who had previously attended our dining center events, we knew we could still make the Census education campaign a success.

Read More

Project OpenHand-Columbus Logo

National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

By | Featured News, POHC

Today is National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day (NHAAD), a yearly observance launched by The AIDS Institute that focuses on the challenges the aging population faces in regards to HIV/AIDS and to highlight prevention, testing, care, and treatment.

Older adults in the U.S. are more likely to have late stage HIV infection at the time of diagnosis, which means they start treatment late and possibly suffer more immune-system damage. According to the CDC, an estimated 47% of individuals in the U.S. diagnosed with HIV were aged 50 and older in 2015. Project OpenHand-Columbus (POHC) serves a critical need by providing nutritious food for individuals living with HIV/AIDS. The program began in San Francisco, was founded in Columbus in 1994, and merged with LifeCare Alliance in 2004.

LifeCare Alliance would like to bring our recent supporters of POHC to light on this day. This past year, we received assistance for POHC clients from Broadway Cares/Equity Fights AIDS and Janssen Therapeutics, and emergency funding from the MAC Viva Glam Fund and The Legacy Fund of the Columbus Foundation. We would not be able to serve those living with HIV/AIDS without the help of the above mentioned organizations and businesses. Thank you for nourishing the human spirit!

-By Stephanie Rowe Bencic, LifeCare Alliance

Learn more

Visit Project OpenHand-Columbus’s page to learn more about POHC’s efforts to fight HIV/AIDS through nutrition!

Funders Make 2020 CODA Virtual Camp Possible

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News
According to the 2020 National Diabetes Statistics Report from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, nearly 1.6 million Americans have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D) — up from 1.25 million people, or nearly 30%, from 2017.

Because of alarming statistics like these, the Central Ohio Diabetes Association (CODA) exists to help people navigate the unfamiliar waters of managing diabetes. This comes in the form of a quintessential childhood experience — summer camp.

“Lilly does not feel alone anymore,” explains mom Rebecca, who knows how important the camp experience is for her daughter with type 1 diabetes. “I cannot thank you enough for not stepping, but dive bombing into the uncomfortable unknown to make this year’s camp possible. It will help us get through this year.” Read More

Attitude of Gratitude

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

I have had this article on my mind for a while, and I just never put myself in front of the computer to write it. Then I got to see virtual Camp Hamwi in action, and I felt like the timing couldn’t be better.

So, let’s talk about how we practice gratitude!

Gratitude plays a huge part in my life. I have a gratitude journal that I have kept for close to two years, and I practice it daily. No matter how big or small, there will always be something to be grateful for every day.

When you have a child who is managing diabetes, it can be difficult sometimes to see those grateful moments. It is challenging to watch them get poked and prodded. It is heartbreaking to hear them say they wish they weren’t diabetic anymore. It is a test as a parent to have to tell them to come sit down and get their sugar up, instead of playing with their friends.

But what you see, expands. So, when you focus on the moments of gratitude, it just invites more moments to be grateful for!

I like to exercise my gratitude journal on our porch, where I can drink my coffee in the morning and start my days in a mindset thinking of good things to come! One weekend, Logan asked if he could join me. Of course, I said yes, because, MELT MY HEART, a quiet time to spend with my son sharing what we are grateful for…I’m all in!

On that Saturday morning, I shared my gratitude journal with him. I asked him to list three things he was grateful for. His list: family, friends, video games. Do you know how excited I was that video games were THIRD on the list?! That is a miracle! Then we sat for a few minutes enjoying the peace and quiet of the morning before he was done, and we moved on with the day. I LOVED THAT MORNING <3

Now I see SO much more to be grateful for with virtual camp! This has been an amazing two weeks for me as a parent to get a glimpse of how these children interact when they have the stigma of being “the kids with diabetes” pushed aside. I have learned so much. And I have such a list of people I am grateful for:

I am grateful for counselors who have the patience of saints! Logan talks a lot, and about randomly weird things. His counselors have been so patient and respectful of what is on his mind and the randomness that are his thoughts.

I am grateful for directors and CODA staffers who have worked COUNTLESS hours putting this camp together in very short time! They have put their hearts and souls into these two weeks, and it shows.

I am grateful for YOU, the other diabetes families who have adjusted your schedules and lives for two weeks for camp to be able to have your camper participate! I see so much engagement and fun being had! I t could not be done without some changes and sacrifices from families.

In the end, no day is perfect. But that doesn’t mean it is all a loss. How will you find gratitude and joy in your day each day and share that with your child?

About

Son's gratitude list of family, friends, and video games.

This blog post is PART SEVEN of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

We Couldn’t Have Done It Without You: A Sincere Thank You to Our Emergency Funders

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels
Note from a Meals on WHeels client

A note from a Meals-on-Wheels client illustrates the impact of LifeCare Alliance’s services during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over the past four months since COVID-19 has taken hold, LifeCare Alliance has had to significantly alter its services to meet the changing needs within the community.

During the week of March 1-7, the Agency’s Meals-on-Wheels program served 15,439 meals through our Meals-on-Wheels program. In contrast, during the week of June 21-27, the Agency served 24,537 meals. LifeCare Alliance has experienced as much as a 65 percent increase in meals served, resulting from heightened client demand in all of the five counties we serve: Franklin, Madison, Champaign, Logan, and Marion. At the height of the pandemic, the Agency added as many as 500 new clients a day!

Most meal service starts within 24 hours of receiving the contact or referral. LifeCare Alliance continues to receive numerous requests for services daily, and the Agency accepts all those who qualify.

LifeCare Alliance didn’t meet this demand on our own, however; we have been incredibly fortunate to receive emergency-response funding from a number of generous corporate and community partners.

We would like to sincerely thank the following funders who have so generously partnered with us to keep our doors open during this unprecedented time of COVID-19:

  • American Electric Power Foundation
  • Battelle
  • Big Lots Foundation
  • City of Columbus
  • City of Columbus Recreation & Parks CARES Fund
  • Columbia Gas/NiSource
  • The Columbus Foundation
  • Columbus Jewish Foundation
  • Crane Group
  • CVS Health Foundation
  • Delta Dental Foundation
  • Fishel Foundation
  • Franklin County Emergency Food and Shelter Program & CARES Funding
  • Logan County Emergency Food and Shelter Program
  • Madison County Emergency Food and Shelter Program & CARES Funding
  • First Merchants Bank
  • Franklin County Commissioners
  • Grange Insurance
  • Honda of America Foundation
  • Huntington Foundation
  • George J. Igel & Co. Inc.
  • IGS Foundation
  • Kokosing
  • The Legacy Fund
  • MAC AIDS Viva Glam Fund
  • Marion Rotary Foundation
  • Meals on Wheels America
  • Nationwide Foundation
  • Osteopathic Heritage Foundation
  • Quantum Health
  • United Way of Central Ohio
  • United Way of Logan County
  • United Way of North Central Ohio

And this is not even to mention the number of clients who contributed under difficult circumstances. LifeCare Alliance thanks all who helped continue the vision of the Agency’s founder, to “take care of those no one else pays any attention to.”

These funders have allowed the Agency to continue to serve the most vulnerable among us in a variety of ways. In addition to access to nourishing food, clients receive health and nutrition education and linkages to community resources and other LifeCare Alliance programs. Examples include the Senior PetCare program, which delivers pet food to the homes of clients, and the Beat the Heat Fan Campaign, which provides box fans during the hot summer months. The Agency advocates for client needs in the community and through relationships with local elected officials, promotes services through marketing and community outreach, and enriches community engagement by increasing and strengthening volunteer engagement.

With the emergency funds received, LifeCare Alliance also has been able to resume essential services that were initially closed as the pandemic ramped up.

  • The annual Beat the Heat Fan Campaign is underway, and the Agency is accepting fans to distribute weekly to clients in need.
  • The Central Ohio Diabetes Association will host summer camps virtually this year, from July 12-26.
  • The Columbus Cancer Clinic restarted regular mammograms as of May 18 and continues to be fully scheduled. The Groceries-to-Go Food Pantry, which serves CCC clients and their families, experienced a 53 percent increase in service numbers.
  • LA Catering has developed several “take out” options and new methods of delivering safe catering. Catering staff is taking reservations and can help with reopening needs.
  • Meals-for-Kids, a social enterprise, is now serving 22 daycare sites, representing more than 500 meals served per day. If all goes well, the Agency hopes to return to 60+ sites and more than 2,100 meals per day in the fall.
  • Project OpenHand-Columbus serves clients who are fighting HIV/AIDS. Many clients are self-isolating during this pandemic — some losing work because of it. COVID-19 has caused the emergency meal service to be needed at an increased rate. The number of clients served has doubled.
  • Senior PetCare continues to distribute food to almost 1,000 clients and provide veterinary care to pets in need.
  • Wellness has restarted several services, including staffing by registered nurses and registered dietitians at  community wellness centers across Franklin County.

In light of the increased client demand, the most remarkable achievement the Agency has accomplished is continuing to accept all clients in need, without a waiting list. This contrasts with a recent survey by Meals on Wheels America, which reports that 55 percent of programs nationally have increased their wait lists, with average increases of 26 percent. About 22 percent of programs’ wait lists have doubled, or more.

LifeCare Alliance is proud to be in this position, in large part because of the support of the partners mentioned above. LifeCare Alliance has received tremendous community support for emergency funding, but the Agency has not seen meal number increases slowing down. Clients will be the last group able to leave their homes as the pandemic subsides, so LifeCare Alliance anticipates this need will continue for the foreseeable future.

The Agency sincerely thanks the emergency funders for Nourishing the Human Spirit by going above and beyond to support LifeCare Alliance during this challenging time!

— By Crystal Kurzen, LifeCare Alliance

Other Siblings and the Fear of the Unknown

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

I want to take a few minutes and talk about siblings. Many of us may have more than one child, and the dynamic of siblings on a normal basis is interesting to say the least. But when you throw in them having a sibling that sometimes gets “special treatment” because of them being diabetic, it adds another layer.

Logan is our oldest, 8, and is Type 1 diabetic. Then we have Addison, who is 5 going on 25! Addison will probably never remember life before Logan was diabetic. She has seen a LOT in her short, almost 6, years! She was only 5-months old when her daddy lost his leg in a farm accident, and now she is seeing her daddy and big brother live with diabetes. She is destined to do SOMETHING in the medical field! If we’re lucky, it’s going to be finding a cure <3.

She has always been my helper when it comes to the medical care. Whether it was helping hold bandages when I was doing wound care for Andrew, being the bossiest little nurse when it comes to Logan getting his sugar checked and taking his insulin, or now keeping track of his Dexcom!

So, what I wasn’t prepared for was when the fear started to creep in for Andrew that she might be diabetic (because he felt like she was drinking too much water, and visiting the bathroom a little too much).

I expected the fear from Andrew. He has almost been waiting for it. But, I wasn’t expecting MY fear. I was finding myself hesitating to agree to check her sugar. I noticed myself trying to convince myself that he was crazy. And when I sat with it and explored why, it was because of fear. And, not necessarily the fear of her being diabetic. It was the fear of Andrew having to sit with it. I didn’t want him to blame himself again.

So I decided one Saturday morning, when he was at the farm, to tell her we were going to check her sugar.

More fear I was not expecting.

She has watched daddy and Logan check their sugar since before she can remember. But when it was her turn, it was a different story.

It turned into about an hour-long conversation/crying/screaming ordeal. Tears on both sides. It only ended because I had engaged the lancet and didn’t tell her. When she finally took it, she pushed the button before I could tell her. Oh, she was NOT a fan. But, we did it! We checked her sugar, and it was normal. All of that fear and anxiety of the UNKNOWN created such a stress in my life for weeks that could have been avoided. Not the hour-long ordeal probably, but everything else…yes.

So, I’m curious. How do you handle siblings? Is there a question mark in your mind? Is there something you do special with them so they don’t get lost in the shuffle? Do they play a part in managing their sibling’s diabetes?

There is NO right or wrong answer on this one. Each and every one of us will have a different way that works for our family. And if you feel like its not working, trying something else! We are all here to learn and these kids of ours are usually the best teachers.

About

Family photo of Dunlap family

This blog post is PART SIX of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Bicycle Training or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Struggle

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

I am going to give an example of my bad parenting. Logan is 8 and still doesn’t know how to ride a bike. I am the worst parent in the world, I know.

I can give you all the reasons/excuses as to why, like when he was three his daddy got in a really bad farm accident and lost his leg. For the next few years my attention was focused on those daily battles of infections, surgeries, an infant (his little sister, Addison) and just balancing life. I could also tell you that our gravel driveway was hard for him to pedal, and the yard was worse.

No matter the reasons, the current reality is that Logan is an 8-year-old who doesn’t know how to ride a bike.

Now that we have more flat space and more time (because we have nothing but time now!), I really want him to learn.

He got a bike for Christmas and we tried a few weeks ago. Some would see it as an epic failure. I just learned that as a big kid, I needed more than just my arms to hold him up on his bike! So, the Easter Bunny brought training wheels.

Off we went again on Easter Sunday to ride bikes.

I have learned so much in this experience! I learned that my husband and I have two very different teaching methods. I recognize that this is going to be a process and we need to start with learning to fall. Andrew says, “he’s 8, he should know how to do it — just go do it.”

But we also now have an 8-year-old who doesn’t want to fall. He doesn’t want to do it scared. He wants it to be just as easy as it is in the video games where you can ride off the jump, break into thousands of pieces and just pop right up again without feeling any pain.

So, this bike riding lesson turned into a lesson about recognizing in life there are going to be things that are hard. There are going to times when you don’t want to do something and it’s going to hurt, and you’re going to want to go home and forget about it. But you still have to do it. Like diabetes. It is going to be hard. It is going to be painful. There is no way that we as parents can take that away from our children. So, we have to stop putting that expectation on ourselves to “make it better” for them.

There is a principle I learned that strikes home in almost every facet of life:

Pain is inevitable, suffering is optional.

There will be hard times. There will be times where you want to give up. But don’t live in there. Don’t feel sorry for yourself or your child for those moments. Create out of them the strength that failure only exists if you stop trying. So, don’t ever stop trying.

About

Family photo of Dunlap family

This blog post is PART FIVE of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Ramp Installed at Home

UPDATE: Home Repairs, New Ramp Improve Accessibility for Veteran Couple

By | Featured News, Help-at-Home

Bob and Linda are strong community advocates in Columbus’ South Side Parsons Area Commission.

The married couple’s neighborhood pride pushes them to clean up crime and property damage in their community. But as issues with the roof and porch on their own home worsened, Bob and Linda needed some help. Their roof was damaged and part of their porch was sinking.

Bob served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Over the years, he and his wife have dealt with several medical issues. He is one of many veterans that LifeCare Alliance is assisting through the Helping Hometown Heroes grant provided by Home Depot and Meals on Wheels America.

“We were in dire need of help and they came to our rescue to help us out,” Linda said. “And now our roof is fixed along with our porch. We just thank you from the bottom of our heart!!”

Bob shared his story with us:

I served in the Army from 1968-1971, doing one term in Vietnam.

When I got out of the service we got the house, and after some years we starting having a lot of issues with the house. We got a hold of LifeCare Alliance through a community meeting we were attending when Maurice talked about the program. LifeCare saved my rear end by coming out and fixing my roof and my dangerously sinking front porch that we were cited for from City Code Enforcement.

Without LifeCare Alliance, there would have been no way I could have afforded to do these repairs unless I hit the lottery or something.

UPDATE: Two years later, a code officer contacted LifeCare Alliance to report that Linda’s health issues were affecting her mobility. He said Linda took a very bad fall of the back porch area.

LifeCare Alliance contacted the couple to see what we could do for them. They asked if we could build some type of ramp off the back porch leading down to the garage to help Linda with her mobility issues.

Linda shared her story with us:

I wanted to thank LifeCare Alliance, The Home Depot and the kind and professional gentleman contractors from B & B Property, who have always taken care of our needs.

After meeting Maurice at one of the association meetings where he spoke about this program, our lives haven’t been the same since. He and his team have been such a blessing to us and allowing us to stay in our home safely. There was no way we could afford to do any of the work that LifeCare and Team Depot has provided us the past two years. I also want to mention our code officer and friend Robert for looking out for us.

LifeCare Alliance clients Bob and Linda

Before:

Before Ramp Installation - Porch with steps

After:

Logan poses with a baseball bat

Don’t Let Panic Guide Your Response When Things “Escalate Quickly”

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

Wow…has life changed in a month! I just keep flashing back to a meme I saw on social media that read, “well that escalated quickly.” NO KIDDING!

But when I stepped back to think about this crazy worldwide pandemic that we are experiencing, I also think I’ve been through things that “escalated quickly” before.

These things have been scary and life altering, and yet, here I am, still living life to the fullest daily.

When Logan was diagnosed with T1D it felt like one of those things that went in slow motion, but at warp speed all at the same time. My husband, Andrew, is diabetic, and this was his biggest fear in having children. I remember him saying to me “I just don’t want our kids to be diabetic.”

So when he started seeing signs in Logan, I thought for sure it was him overreacting. Logan drank a lot of chocolate milk at night, so of course he would have to go to the bathroom at night. That doesn’t mean he’s diabetic. When I agreed to have Andrew check Logan’s sugar, I thought I was going to be proving my point.

I was wrong.

That’s when I felt like things were in slow motion, but in warp speed. It all of the sudden escalated quickly.

But I say all of that to say this: We’ve been through life-altering, scary things before. True, it was not on a worldwide pandemic level. But tell me someone who DIDN’T have the feeling of your life crumbling around you, just for a minute, when your child was diagnosed with diabetes?

How did you handle that life altering, scary moment in your life? Did you cry a lot? Did you yell? Did you let your “type A” personality kick in and just keep organized and systematic to keep it all together? And after you remember how you handled it, answer this question: Did it work well for you?

If it did—GREAT! Then you know what way works best for you in this situation to get through this.

If it didn’t, you get to make a choice. What will you change TODAY to help you feel more confident in how you respond to our current reality?

There is A LOT of panic in the world right now. And again, you may have had that feeling before in life. I implore you to go back to that moment and think about how it served you in that moment. More times than not, panic just builds the fear and anxiety and makes it more difficult to focus on the facts.

The facts we have, as I see them, are that we get the opportunity to slow down and spend time with our family. We get to catch up with friends in ways that we have never taken the time to do before. We get to show people how to handle fear and anxiety that we have experienced with feeling. Right now, we get to model for people the best way we can to lean into strength and conscious choices, rather than fear and panic.

Finally, let me tell you this: It is still normal, no matter how many scary things you have been through, to still have fear, grief, and a whole multitude of emotions. But you’ve been here before when it comes to the thoughts and emotions of “life is over,” “life will never be the same.”

YOU’VE GOT THIS.

Don’t push that experience away or downplay it…use it as your superpower.

About

Family photo of Dunlap family

This blog post is PART FOUR of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Eternally by Matt Munhall

By | Meals-on-Wheels | No Comments
Esteemed musician Matt Munhall wrote and recorded the song “Eternally” for LifeCare Alliance in 2010.
In the song, the agency’s tagline, “Nourishing the Human Spirit,” rings true both for the client being served and the volunteer who gives of herself to care for others.
The message in this song is dear to our Agency. Click the play button above to hear the song, and read along with the lyrics below.

Eternally

(©2010 Matt Munhall, Parker MacDonell)

Billy’s standing in his doorway at noon
When up the driveway comes Mary
Thinks to himself she’s not a moment too soon
He knows the treasure she carries
And he says,
“Ah, Mary, what would I do without you?
I just don’t know what I’d do”
And she says,
“I need you
Like you need me
I bring you bread and though it’s hard to see
When I feed you
You feed me
You nourish the spirit within me, eternally”
Sometimes it’s hard to find good souls that care
God bless the hearts that are giving
If not for them, I wonder who would be there
Who would keep the hungry souls living?
Ah, Lord, what would we do without you?
I just don’t know what we’d do
I need you
Like you need me
I bring you bread and though it’s hard to see
When I feed you
You feed me
You nourish the spirit within me
When you find yourself thinking
About all you’re not
Make your heart like Mary’s and give it all…
Give it all you got…cause someday
I’ll need you
Like you’ll need me
When you bring you bread and company
I’ll feed you
As you feed me
I’ll nourish the spirit within you, eternally

From our President & CEO: COVID-19 Update for LifeCare Alliance Volunteers and Supporters

By | Featured News, Help-at-Home, Meals-on-Wheels, Volunteers

June 8, 2020 UPDATE

SERVICE UPDATES

Meals-on-Wheels numbers continue to grow.  Our food production and delivery teams continue to amaze.  

  • Meal delivery has increased by 68% since March 1st.
  • The number of home delivered meal clients increased by 54% since March 1st.
  • Most meal service starts within 24 hours of receiving the contact or referral.
  • We continue to receive numerous requests for services daily, and we CONTINUE TO ACCEPT ALL THOSE WHO QUALIFY.  This contrasts with a recent survey by Meals-on-Wheels of America which reports that 55% of programs nationally have increased their already existing waitlists, with 22% of programs’ waitlists having doubled or more.
  • Meals delivered by week for the past several weeks are:
    • Week of 5/31-6/6  =  25,884
    • Week of 5/24-5/30  =  25,065
    • Week of 5/17-5/23  =  25,423
    • Week of 5/10-5/16   =  25,315
    • Week of 5/3-5/9  =  25,190
    • Week of 4/26-5/2  =  24,998
    • Week of 4/19-4/25  =  23,622
    • Week of 4/12-4/18  =  22,489
    • Week of 4/5-4/11  =  20,839
    • Week of 3/29-4/4  =  19,857
    • Week of 3/22-3/28  =  18,571
    • Week of 3/15-3/21  =  16,413
    • Week of 3/8-3/14  =  15,752
    • Week of 3/1-3/7  =  15,439

 The Columbus Cancer Clinic continues to add new families in need of pantry service.  Almost all pantry items are being delivered to client homes.

  • This represents a 53% increase in the number of individuals served since January and 77 new families.
  • The Columbus Cancer Clinic restarted regular mammograms Monday, May 18.
  • Total clients served by the CCC pantry:
    • January = 974 individuals with 10 new client pantry families
    • April = 1,492 individuals with 27 new client pantry families

The Central Ohio Diabetes Association camps will be held as VIRTUAL CAMP in 2020, and have developed a number of interesting activities.  Campers will be divided into small groups like their “cabins” and work with their counselors.  Staff is planning potential in person activities for later this year.

Wellness is restarting several services including Wellness Centers.  TeleHealth will continue, but Wellness Centers began seeing clients last week, in a safe manner.

Meals-for-Kids—We expect sites to begin reopening for summer. 

Our Senior Farmers’ Market will continue with coupons being mailed, instead of holding a distribution day.  The farmers will deliver the produce to us in bulk and we will deliver it, or clients can pick up. 

Senior PetCare continues to deliver pet food to clients in need for their dogs and cats.

L.A. Catering has developed several “take out” and new methods of delivering a safe catering, so please use them for your upcoming reopening and graduation events.  Everything can be individually boxed.  I hope you will use our LA Catering as you plan your events.

IMPACT Safety is providing on line programming in a number of areas.

VOLUNTEER UPDATES

We continue to receive new volunteers each day, and have received 1,500 new volunteer applications online since March 16. Volunteers have insured that all meals, pet food, and pantry items are delivered. We still need more as many are returning to work.   

LIFECARE ALLIANCE IN THE MEDIA

LifeCare Alliance President & CEO Chuck Gehring appeared on the Columbus Metropolitan Club virtual meeting on Wednesday, May 13 at noon, along with Dr. Lisa Courtice, CEO of United Way of Central Ohio. The moderator was Colleen Marshall of WCMH NBC4. The topic was “Nonprofits’ Frontline Response”. If you missed this, simply go to the Columbus Metropolitan Club website and click on the May 13 event. It is also rerun on some cable channels. Other media coverage can be found here.

Previous updates

March 23, 2020 Update

Dear friends,

Today, Meals-on-Wheels drivers and volunteers are sharing stories from the front lines, as they serve those most in need. We want to share a couple of these stories with you, our most faithful supporters.

“Clients have cried with gratitude when receiving their meals – they weren’t sure if we would be continuing with our deliveries.”

“Upon arriving to a home, I [volunteer] heard a client yelling for help. I called 911 and waited for the EMT to arrive. Once inside the home, I saw that the client was lying on the floor unable to get up.”

Your generosity makes this possible and we are grateful!

Yesterday, Governor DeWine announced a “Stay at Home” Order, beginning at 11:59 pm tonight. You may have questions about what this means for LifeCare Alliance and our critical daily services. Governor DeWine and the Federal government acknowledge our services as essential, which must go on. We will continue to provide food and basic needs services to home-bound neighbors. In fact, the need for Meals-on-Wheels continues to increase daily from multiple sources:

  1. individuals who are shifting from congregate dining center sites to now receive home-delivered meals,
  2. older adults who are temporarily home-bound due to COVID-19 precautions,
  3. and most recently, neighbors with developmental disabilities who typically attend adult day programs, but have been temporarily closed.

We have implemented significant changes to our services over the past week, taking steps for staff to work remotely, reducing or suspending non-essential tasks, and making modifications to essential tasks to ensure the maximum amount of precaution possible. As always, we invite you to stay connected and informed through our website, and via Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Volunteers—we still need you!

Healthy adults who can deliver meals are key to the success of caring for homebound neighbors during this time. THANK YOU to the hundreds of people who have already stepped up to serve.  You are so valued and so needed, and we are grateful for your commitment and compassion to the most vulnerable in our community. Please take a moment to review the most current procedures and updates below for Meals-on-Wheels and Groceries-to-Go pantry deliveries.

Donors—we still need you!

Many of you have already stepped up so generously to give an extra gift to help support the increased demand.  THANK YOU! With your help, we are on the frontlines of this pandemic, and quite literally the hands and feet that are providing life-sustaining services. If you would like to make a donation, you may do so by:

  1. Giving online at: https://www.lifecarealliance.org/donate/online-donation/
  2. Sending a check to: LifeCare Alliance, 1699 W. Mound Street, Columbus, OH 43223

Thank you for standing with us during this most critical time to ensure that we can continue serving those most in need in our community.

Your partner in Nourishing the Human Spirit,

Charles W. Gehring,
President & CEO

IMPORTANT MEALS-ON-WHEELS, PANTRY, & VOLUNTEER UPDATES:

To ensure that basic needs are met, while also implementing as much social distancing as possible, volunteers are temporarily approved to knock/ring the doorbell and leave the meal at the door—with visual confirmation that the client receives the meal.

  • Exceptions:
    • If you encounter a client who is too frail to reach all the way down to retrieve the meal from the front doorstep, please assist that client with moving a small chair/table outside for future deliveries, thus reducing future contact.
    • If you encounter a client who is bed-bound, please proceed with direct hand-off.
  • Temperature Checks: Due to the shortage of thermometers, we ask that volunteers check their temperature from home before arriving to volunteer.
  • We continue to need volunteers to delivery daily. We have established rapid response volunteer training sessions to help onboard new volunteers quickly and seamlessly.
    • New volunteers can begin by completing our online application here and attending an 11:00 am training at 670 Harmon Avenue, Columbus, OH 43223. Training will occur daily and volunteers may have the opportunity to deliver a route that day if there are openings.
    • Existing volunteers can sign up for an open route at any time online at: https://lifecare.mowscheduler.com/helpwanted
  • The Groceries-to-Go food pantry has moved to curbside pick-up and home delivery Monday – Friday, and is also in need of volunteers.  Volunteers are needed for both delivery and packing and preparation, and can apply and get started via the process noted above.

ADDITIONAL SERVICE UPDATES:

  • As telehealth options increase, our staff is putting measures in place to ensure that wellness and diabetes consultations can take place by phone.
  • Columbus Cancer Clinic activities have been modified so that essential functions like diagnostic screenings and food pantry assistance can continue. Non-essential screenings and activities have been suspended.
  • Help-at-Home services have been significantly reduced or modified to provide only essential tasks with as much precaution as possible.
  • Carrie’s Café is closed until further notice.
  • Congregate Dining Centers are closed and clients are now being moved to home-delivered meals.

ONGOING REMINDERS FOR VOLUNTEERS:

  • Please continue to observe the recommendation that volunteers not involve children in delivery at this time. If you must bring children on the route, please ensure that they stay in the car and not go up to the door.
  • If you have specific questions or concerns regarding your route or volunteering, please contact us at mowdriverssupervisors@lifecarealliance.org or 614-437-2891.
  • If you have known exposure, or are experiencing or exhibiting symptoms consistent with Coronavirus, according to the CDC—fever, shortness of breath, cough—we ask that you please stay home and not risk exposing others to possible illness. Please notify us via Meals-on-Wheels Scheduler, or the above contact information if you need to cancel.
  • Please practice the recommended precautions from the CDC – proper hand washing for at least twenty seconds, covering coughs/sneeze with your arm, staying home when sick, and avoiding exposure to others who are sick.

March 19, 2020 Update

To LifeCare Alliance Volunteers and Supporters:

We continue to navigate daily adjustments for COVID-19 precautions. Our highest priority is maintaining the most critical basic services for those who need daily food and care, while making necessary changes to modify or temporarily suspend non-critical services. Volunteer and program updates are ever-changing, and staff are preparing for increased work-from-home capacity wherever possible. Please take a moment to review our most recent update below and stay informed by visiting our website and following us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to stay informed.

IMPORTANT MEALS-ON-WHEELS, PANTRY, & VOLUNTEER UPDATES:

The need for Meals-on-Wheels continues to increase daily—both from our congregate dining center clients who are now receiving home-delivered meals, and from an increased need in the community from older adults who are temporarily home-bound due to COVID-19 precautions.  To ensure that basic needs are met, while also implementing as much social distancing as possible, volunteers are temporarily approved to knock/ring the doorbell and leave the meal at the door—with visual confirmation that the client receives the meal.

Exceptions:

    • If you encounter a client who is too frail to reach all the way down to retrieve the meal from the front doorstep, please assist that client with moving a small chair/table outside for future deliveries, thus reducing future contact.
    • If you encounter a client who is bed-bound, please proceed with direct hand-off.

Concerns:

    • If you have a concern for the well-being of a client, please report that to Meals-on-Wheels staff by:
      • Making a note on the delivery record.
      • Completing an observation report.
      • Calling the driver supervisors at 614-437-2891.

Temperature Checks coming soon! We are working to get thermometers onsite, and will begin taking temperatures upon entry to all of our buildings.

We continue to need volunteers to delivery daily. We have established rapid response volunteer training to help on-board new volunteers quickly and seamlessly.

  • New volunteers can begin same-day by completing our online application here and attending a 11:00 am training at 670 Harmon Avenue, Columbus, OH 43223. Training will occur daily for any new volunteers to join that day.
  • Existing volunteers can sign up for an open route at any time online at: https://lifecare.mowscheduler.com/helpwanted

The Groceries-to-Go food pantry has moved to curbside pick-up and home delivery. Volunteers are needed for both delivery and packing and preparation, and can apply and get started via the process noted above.

ADDITIONAL SERVICE UPDATES:

  • As telehealth options increases, our staff is putting measures in place to ensure that wellness and diabetes consultations can take place by phone.
  • Columbus Cancer Clinic activities have been modified so that essential functions like diagnostic screenings and food pantry assistance can continue. Non-essential screenings and activities have been suspended.
  • Help-at-Home services have been significantly reduced or modified to provide only essential tasks with as much precaution as possible.
  • Carrie’s Café is closed until further notice.
  • Congregate Dining Centers are closed and clients are now being moved to home-delivered meals.

ONGOING REMINDERS FOR VOLUNTEERS:

  • Please continue to observe the recommendation that volunteers not involve children in delivery at this time. If you must bring children on the route, please ensure that they stay in the car and not go up to the door.
  • If you have specific questions or concerns regarding your route or volunteering, please contact us at mowdriverssupervisors@lifecarealliance.org or 614-437-2891.
  • If you have known exposure, or are experiencing or exhibiting symptoms consistent with Coronavirus, according to the CDC—fever, shortness of breath, cough—we ask that you please stay home and not risk exposing others to possible illness. Please notify us via Meals-on-Wheels Scheduler, or the above contact information if you need to cancel.
  • Please practice the recommended precautions from the CDC – proper hand washing for at least twenty seconds, covering coughs/sneeze with your arm, staying home when sick, and avoiding exposure to others who are sick.

HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT:

Thank you to those who have already stepped up to support!  We are truly in this together as a community—and our staff and clients are feeling that sentiment in very real ways right now.  While our staff is being stretched daily to implement new procedures to ensure that those most in need receive care during this time, we are also acutely aware that there has never been a time in recent history where critical missions like ours has been at the center of national discussion.  People everywhere are getting a small glimpse of what home-bound neighbors face daily.

  • Volunteers are our biggest need right now.  If you are able to help, please sign up to volunteer through the process indicated above.
  • Like many in our community, we are already seeing significant impact from the implications of COVID-19, by way of revenue losses, cancellations, etc.  If you would like to make a donation, please do so by:

Your partner in Nourishing the Human Spirit,

Charles W. Gehring,
President & CEO

March 16, 2020 Update

To LifeCare Alliance Volunteers and Supporters:

As COVID-19 continues to spread, and officials continue to recommend increased social distancing and closures, LifeCare Alliance is monitoring the situation.  We are making adjustments to critical nutrition and health services that we provide daily.  As you know, our clients are among the most vulnerable in our community—and thus, the need for our services to continue is paramount.  Thank you for your continued support to ensure that those most in need can receive basic needs during this time.  Please take a moment to review our most recent update below to learn how we are continuing to both protect and provide for the wellbeing of our clients, staff, and volunteers.  You can also see current updates by visiting our website and following us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram to stay informed.

PROGRAM UPDATES:

  1. Most core programs and services are currently still operating, within the recommended parameters set by our state and local officials. As long as we are able, we plan to continue services, with an emphasis on the most basic needs, such as food.  As service changes arise, we will continue to keep our community updated, and communicate specifically with impacted service areas.  Agency and program leadership is continuing to put both process and reporting protocols in place, to ensure that we can make any necessary modifications going forward.
  2. Current program closures/alterations:
    • Carrie’s Café is closed, effective Monday, March 16, 2020.
    • Congregate Dining Centers will be closed by Tuesday, March 17, 2020. Dining center clients will have the option to receive home-delivered meals.
    • Our Groceries-to-Go food pantry is taking steps to move completely to curbside pick-up and home delivery. Additional details will be provided soon.

IMPORTANT MEALS-ON-WHEELS DELIVERY UPDATE:

  1. We have received guidance from our regulatory bodies and funders.  In the interest of public health, Meals-on-Wheels programs statewide have been given permission to temporarily suspend the customer signature requirement at time of meal delivery.  This means that the volunteer’s signature on the delivery record will suffice until the risk level lessens.  As the situation continues to develop and evolve throughout central Ohio, we will keep you all posted through email and delivery record alerts.
  2. Medical experts have shared that children can be carriers, even without exhibiting symptoms, so we recommend that volunteers not involve children in delivery at this time. If you must bring children on the route, please ensure that they stay in the car and not go up to the door.
  3. We continue to need volunteers to delivery daily. We have established rapid response volunteer training to help on-board new volunteers quickly and seamlessly.
    • New volunteers can begin same-day by completing our online application here and attending a 10:00 am training at 670 Harmon Avenue, Columbus, OH 43223. Training will occur daily for any new volunteers to join that day.
    • Existing volunteers can sign up for an open route at any time online at: https://lifecare.mowscheduler.com/helpwanted

ONGOING REMINDERS FOR VOLUNTEERS:

  1. Should meal routes or other activities be further altered, we will proactively communicate with volunteers who are scheduled or impacted by the change. Please watch for future updates. If you have specific questions or concerns regarding your route or volunteering, please contact us at mowdriverssupervisors@lifecarealliance.org or 614-437-2891.
  2. If you are experiencing or exhibiting symptoms consistent with Coronavirus, according to the CDC—fever, shortness of breath, cough—we ask that you please stay home and not risk exposing others to possible illness. Please notify us via Meals-on-Wheels Scheduler, or the above contact information if you need to cancel.
  3. Please practice the recommended precautions from the CDC – proper hand washing for at least twenty seconds, covering coughs/sneeze with your arm, staying home when sick, and avoiding exposure to others who are sick.

HOW YOU CAN SUPPORT:

  1. Volunteers are our biggest need right now. If you are able to help, please sign up to volunteer through the process indicated above.
  2. Like many in our community, we are already seeing significant impact from the implications of COVID-19, by way of revenue losses, cancellations, etc. If you would like to make a donation, please do so by:

Times like these shine a spotlight on the critical importance of LifeCare Alliance’s services—today and every day—and we are grateful for your partnership. YOU make it possible to uphold our mission and to care for central Ohio neighbors most in need. Thank you for your care, concern, and commitment during this unprecedented time.

Your partner in Nourishing the Human Spirit,

Charles W. Gehring
President and CEO

March 10, 2020 Update

A Special Message to LifeCare Alliance Volunteers and Supporters:

Thank you for being on the front lines of serving our homebound seniors each day throughout central Ohio.  As the state of Ohio now has confirmed cases of COVID-19, we want to share an important update with you as we continue to closely monitor the risk and spread of the coronavirus.

We continue to take important steps to plan for possible scenarios, and receive daily updates from the Ohio Department of Health, Franklin County Board of Health, and Columbus Public Health.  Our leadership team is in regular communication with necessary partners and parties to keep a pulse on the situation and risk.  Please take a moment to read a few important updates below.

  • All agency programs are currently operating normally and we do not anticipate a disruption in services. However, out of an abundance of caution, we are planning for contingency scenarios, as well as taking appropriate precautions to ensure the health and well-being of our clients, as well as our dedicated staff and volunteers.
  • Should meal routes or other activities be altered, we will proactively communicate with volunteers who are scheduled or impacted by the change. Please watch for future updates, should we have new information to share.  If you have specific questions or concerns regarding your route or volunteering, please contact us at mowdriverssupervisors@lifecarealliance.org or 614-437-2891.
  • If you are experiencing or exhibiting symptoms consistent with the coronavirus, according to the CDC — fever, shortness of breath, cough — we ask that you please stay home and not risk exposing others to possible illness. Please notify us via Meals-on-Wheels Scheduler, by email at mowdriverssupervisors@lifecarealliance.org, or by phone at 614-437-2891 if you need to cancel for your route.
  • Please practice the recommended precautions from the CDC — proper handwashing for at least twenty seconds, covering coughs/sneezes with your arm, staying home when sick, and avoiding exposure to others who are sick.

Like many of you, we are concerned for those most vulnerable among us, many of whom are the clients we serve.  Know that we are committed to serving our clients as long as we are able, while taking steps to modify or alter service deliver if/when necessary.  Thank you for your shared concern.  We will provide future updates as new information becomes available.

Your partner in Nourishing the Human Spirit,

Charles W. Gehring,
President and CEO

Click the photo above for information on COVID-19 from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.

Click the Franklin County Public Health logo above for local COVID-19 updates.

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with us

For the most up-to-date information on LifeCare Alliance programs, including any announcements and service adjustments, click here to follow us on Facebook.

Logan playing basketball

A Network of Support Away from Home

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

How do you manage the stress and anxiety of your child’s diabetes management when you aren’t there?

Let’s face it, as much as we would like to be in control 24/7, it is nearly impossible. Even if you are a stay-at-home parent, you still have to send your child to school! It is overwhelming to think about how many adults our children interact with who may need to support them if something were to happen. Teachers, school nurses, school aides, bus drivers, babysitter/daycare provider, coaches/instructors, friend’s parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles. The list can probably go on and on.
But there are two keys that have helped me ensure my child is getting the best possible care and helps keep stress and anxiety down.

Key #1: COMMUNICATION

I am in the camp that believes overcommunicating is better than assuming. When Logan was in kindergarten, I wrote down a list of “free” snacks he could have and the serving size. In 1st grade, when his diabetes was progressing out of the “honeymoon” phase, I sat down with his teacher and the school nurse. I explained what his body was going through (the best I could anyway!) And from day one, I have always packed his lunch and sent a “carb sheet” that tells the carbs for everything in his lunch and the total. I try to take the guess work out of it.
I also requested the school nurses email me every day with his blood sugars. It was great for me before he was on his pump to see the numbers each day so I could make adjustments, not just get the records every once in a while.
And you know what I learned from being so open about my communication? I have an ARMY of people who care deeply about my son!
Logan has an infectious smile and he thinks he’s smarter than he is…but these people really do CARE. And I may not have seen that if I was not willing to be proactive and develop these partnerships for his care. We are truly blessed with great people in his life.

Key #2: INCLUDE YOUR CHILD IN THEIR CARE

This may seem like a no-brainer, but as parents we want to do everything we can to protect our children. And sometimes we make their lives harder because of it. But Andrew and I have made a conscious effort to not sugarcoat anything with Logan, because it isn’t helping him in the long run. So when Logan goes to a friend’s house, we go over the expectations of when to check and when to call/Facetime me to check carb counts. He is still only 8, so this is not a fool-proof plan and I still give parents far more information than they would probably like (please refer to key 1, LOL!). But we want him to know now that it is a responsibility to take seriously.

Bonus: Gratitude

This is probably the thing that makes these steps so much easier to take on. Express your gratitude to that long list of adults for caring so deeply for your child. Express gratitude to your child for paying attention and making healthy food choices or opting out of the popcorn at the movies with Nana because his sugar is already high (a personal grateful moment!)
This disease is not easy. It can be overwhelming. It can be scary. It can be anxiety inducing. But when you recognize some of the small things that you can impact…do them, unapologetically. And never forget the gratitude.

About

Family photo of Dunlap family

This blog post is PART THREE of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Dunlap children playing video games

Dealing with Mom Guilt During Diabetes Journey

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

You know what comes with a child who is diabetic. MOM GUILT. And I guess it’s more so parent guilt, but as mom’s we like to feel like we’re special.

But that guilt starts when you are presented with the diagnosis. The thoughts start running through your head, “what did I do wrong?” “Was it something I did when I was pregnant?” “I should have caught it sooner, maybe we could have done something!” All of those thoughts we know LOGICALLY are all untrue. But emotions are so much stronger than logic sometimes, and we feel like we have put our child in this position.

Then, there is the guilt around watching them poked and prodded every day. My son, Logan, wanted nothing to do with an insulin pump for almost two years after he was diagnosed. I think mostly because he saw his daddy take shots and prick his finger every day, so that was “normal” to him, he wasn’t about to try something unknown right now. And Logan was amazing and at six years old refused to allow anyone else do his shots but him. But the pit in my throat each time I had to wake him up because he fell asleep early to take his insulin, and the meltdowns that would ensue were perfect for the “mom guilt” to build up.

Or, when he wanted to go to a friend’s house, and I had to talk to the parents and explain that he was diabetic and that he couldn’t really have any snacks. And then the guilt of almost getting his sugar higher than I would like it, just to avoid him going low when I wasn’t around. Guilt, Guilt, Guilt.

But…when those moment of guilt came up, there were almost always moments of intense PRIDE. I am proud of Logan because he still gets up every day to be a regular kid. The only person that is going to give him limitations is me, and he is sure to tell me that too! He was giving himself 5-6 shots a DAY at the age of SIX!!! How could I NOT be proud of that kid!

So, when those emotions come; when the guilt, or the anger or sadness come up, remember:

You get to choose how you feel.

You get to choose whether or not you want to feel that way.

And no matter what you choose, it doesn’t make you any less of an amazing parent.

You get to choose how long you feel that way. When you are thinking how it’s not fair, and that makes you feel sad or guilty.

How willing would you be to try something different?

What if you thought: “how can I make my son/daughter know I love them today?” How does that make you feel?

I would encourage you to go with that. It’s going to do you both a lot of good.

About

Family photo of Dunlap family

This blog post is PART TWO of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Family photo of Dunlap family

The Road to a Type 1 Diagnosis

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News, It Takes a Family

When Logan was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in January 2018 at the age of six, it kind of felt like “what else is going to happen to us?!” My husband Andrew, who is also Type 1 diabetic, had been involved in a farm accident in December 2014 and lost his left leg. We had been facing one uphill battle after another with his recovery, including 2 battles with MRSA. At the time of Andrew’s accident, we had Logan, who was three, and his sister, Addison, who was just 4-months old. I worked full-time and I was thrust into the role of a full-time caregiver along with the role of wife and mother. Now, just as we felt like we were turning a corner, Andrew just knew something wasn’t right.

So, we traveled that heart-crushing road of tests and diagnosis. We went to the lab for blood work where we had to hold Logan down while he screamed because he was so scared. We spent the night in the hospital and explained to him that he was going to take shots like Daddy did.

Don’t get me wrong, I am eternally grateful that we had as much knowledge as we did about this disease and that Logan has his “role model” of a dad to see that he can do this. But it felt like life was kicking us when we were down. Especially when Logan says, “I don’t want to be diabetic anymore.” I mean, insert the dagger right in Mommy’s heart!

But rather than let this journey of life break me down and define me, I chose to let it empower me. I was not going to allow myself, and my family, to be victims. I chose that these experiences in life, as challenging and mind-blowing as they were, gave me the gift of being a caregiver. And the gift to support and empower other parents and caregivers who are experiencing all of these frightening unknowns and don’t know how to manage it all.

Fast forward to 2020: Logan is eight, he played football for the first time last fall and is just getting started on his Omnipod pump! Andrew has been back to work on the farm. Addison is five and will make a fabulous nurse or doctor some day with all the medical stuff she has seen! And I am driven to empower and educate with our story and my message. No matter how unfair or awful it may seem, let your story empower you.

About

This blog post is PART ONE of IT TAKES A FAMILY: LIFE WITH TYPE 1, written by Lindsay Dunlap.

The Dunlap family lives with two generations of T1D, and Lindsay is graciously sharing their experience with us. If you’d like to connect with Lindsay, she’d be happy to talk about the highs and lows with you at lindsay@lindsaydunlapcoaching.com.

Learn More

Click here to learn more about the Central Ohio Diabetes Association, including support for families through programs such as Camp Hamwi.

Meals-on-Wheels logo

Changes ahead for Meals-on-Wheels volunteers

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels, Volunteers

Volunteers should take note of a few changes coming to LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program in the first quarter of 2020.

Route names

In January, the existing route names of the Meals-on-Wheels will be changing. This is due to a significant software change with our client database. There are some great things that will come with this:

  • Route names will be more intuitive to where they are picked up. For instance, if you currently deliver V402, which picks up at Epworth United Methodist Church, the new route name will be FEPW2. This is short for Franklin – Epworth – 2.
  • Routing will be done on a daily basis using geolocation based on active customers for that day and (relatively) real-time traffic. This will allow us to be more precise with the structure and flow of our routes.
  • Once these new route names are fully established, we will share with you the new name for each of the existing routes.

Electronic delivery records

For the last few months, we have been piloting electronic delivery records with a majority of our weekday Meals-on-Wheels routes that pick up at Harmon Avenue. To do this, we are providing tablets enabled with the “Mobile Meals” application, as well as real-time consumer and directional data. This application will replace the paper delivery records that you currently use. We are preparing to roll out the tablets and application to all of our routes throughout early 2020. There are some fantastic things that come with this:

  • You will be able to get real-time directions for your route via the tablet.
  • You will be able to enter notes to the office regarding your route and consumers on your route that we will receive from you electronically in real-time.
  • We will be reaching out to everyone relatively soon with training information on how to use the tablets and the application. We also will share information on in-person training sessions that we will offer for those who would like a more hands-on training.

Learn more

For more information on these changes, call 614-278-3152 or click here to contact Nutrition Programs Director Molly Haroz.

Senior Petcare

How to Select a Charity for Year-End Gifts

By | Featured News, Legacy

The end of the year is a common time for charitable giving. For many, the question isn’t whether to give, but how to designate a gift to have a significant impact on the community.

In central Ohio, there are hundreds of non-profit organizations helping to make Columbus the city it is today.  The first step in making sure your donation makes an impact is to research organizations. This may sound like a daunting task, but is not as difficult or as time-consuming as you might imagine.  Take advantage of information from organizations like Guidestar, Charity Navigator, and the Better Business Bureau. These are widely trusted sources for information about non-profit organizations across the United States. You can search by cause and location to find local non-profits that align with your giving objectives.

Now that you have the names of organizations that interest you, it’s time to learn more about the charity you plan to support. Determine whether the services provided will make the community a better place.  Is the charity sincerely making a difference in our society? Once you have researched the organization, consider the following points before you sign the check:

  • Determine whether the organization is mission-driven.
  • Make sure it fiscally sound.
  • Review the Agency website.
  • Look into speaking with the organization’s CEO or staff.
  • Tour the organization or participate in a volunteer activity to learn first-hand about the organization.
  • Consider what is important to you, such as what your passion is and what motivates you as a donor.
  • Find out whether the organization has a good standing in the community.
  • Determine what percentage of your gift will pay for overhead.

Once you have made your decision, remember to trust your instincts.  Take a moment to examine whether the charity you have selected has secured future funding for the clients they represent.  Investigate whether the charity offers a gift-matching program or has an ongoing endowment campaign.  If the organization has implemented a gift-matching program, this can be enticing to the donor and it presents an opportunity to amplify year-end gifts of cash, checks, securities to endowment funds, or provisions in an estate plan.

Remember: Take time to research the charity you have selected. Some work in the beginning could save you time, but more importantly it could allow your gift to impact many lives of in our community.

Camp Hamwi camper Samantha

White Castle Foundation a longtime supporter of CODA youth diabetes camps

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News

Nov. 14 is World Diabetes Day, and what better way to celebrate than to highlight a longtime supporter of the Central Ohio Diabetes Association’s camp programs, the Ingram-White Castle Foundation.

Since 1951, the Ingram-White Castle Foundation has been providing “nourishment to those throughout central Ohio who hunger for knowledge, independence, and self-sufficiency.” The Foundation further believes that young people should be able to realize their full potential. At CODA’s camp program, children with diabetes experience all of the above.

CODA camp programs include:

  • Camp Hamwi, the weeklong, residential program for children ages 7-17
  • Stepping Stones Camp, a transitional day camp with one overnight outing for children ages 8-12 new to the summer camp experience
  • Kids Day Camp for children ages 3-7, and their parents.

At camp, participants learn to manage their disease, avoid its complications, and improve their health with the education and skills they learn. Camp programs teach skills that significantly decrease the risk of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney disease, and vision loss. These risks can be reduced by up to two-thirds if detected early. There are many components to managing diabetes and preventing its progression, but none more important than education provided in a way that individuals grasp and use. Without the education necessary to care for one’s condition, diabetes will progress.

One such child that has benefited from multiple CODA camps is Samantha. Samantha was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was only 9 months old. She grew up without knowing many other kids with diabetes, but that experience changed when she went to Stepping Stones. Samantha shares, “At Stepping Stones, I learned that I’m not the only diabetic, and there are other people that are going through the same thing as me.” Her experience at Stepping Stones laid such an impact on her that she has gone on to attend Camp Hamwi for the last few years.

Because of supporters like the Ingram-White Castle Foundation, campers like Samantha are able to develop a personal diabetes management plan that includes a healthy meal plan, regular physical exercise, regular checks of blood glucose levels, and taking diabetes medications as prescribed. Also, as Samantha mentioned, going to camp helps children with diabetes no longer feel isolated, and gives them an environment where they can cultivate friendships that last a lifetime.

Thank you to the Ingram-White Castle Foundation for helping children with diabetes live their best life!

LifeCare Alliance joins Subaru, Meals on Wheels America to Share the Love

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels, Press Releases

LifeCare Alliance is proud to announce that it will be participating in the 2019 Subaru Share the Love Event as a member of Meals on Wheels America – one of four national Share the Love charitable partners supported through the campaign. From November 14, 2019, through January 2, 2020, Subaru of America will donate $250 for every new Subaru vehicle purchased or leased to the customer’s choice of participating charities.

“We are proud to partner with Subaru of America for another year of Share the Love,” said LifeCare Alliance President & CEO Chuck Gehring. “Their enthusiastic support is invaluable as we continue to serve all eligible clients in need.”

Participating Meals on Wheels America members, like LifeCare Alliance, will receive a share of the donation raised by Subaru in their state. LifeCare Alliance has partnered with Central Ohio Subaru Dealers to raise awareness for the popular year-end sales and giving event, and drive support for Meals on Wheels.

“Meals on Wheels America is proud to partner with Subaru of America for the 12th consecutive year to enable more seniors to live with independence and dignity,” said Ellie Hollander, President and CEO, Meals on Wheels America. “Since 2008, the Subaru Share the Love Event has helped deliver more than 2.2 million meals and friendly visits to vulnerable seniors nationwide. We’re enormously grateful to Subaru and its retailers for their long-standing commitment to Meals on Wheels and the millions of seniors who depend on it for nourishment and companionship.”

Over the last 11 years, Subaru of America and its participating retailers have donated more than $145 million to its charity partners. This year’s Subaru Share the Love Event is on track to bring that total to over $170 million, proving there’s no limit to the amount of love we can all share.

LifeCare Alliance will receive a share of funds raised through Subaru of America’s Share the Love campaign.

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

This November 14, 2019, through January 2, 2020, for every new Subaru vehicle purchased or leased, Subaru will donate $250 to the customer’s choice of participating charities.* Meals on Wheels is one of four national participating charities and has been since the inception of the event. Through this event, as a member of Meals on Wheels America, LifeCare Alliance will receive a share of the donation from Subaru vehicles sold at participating Subaru Retailers.

You might not be in the market to purchase a new car, but if you are, please look into the Subaru Share the Love Event to learn more. If you’re not shopping for a new vehicle, you can still help by spreading the word to your family and friends. A few quick and easy ways to do that:

And remember: this holiday season you can ensure our senior neighbors are not forgotten, when you purchase or lease a new Subaru and select Meals on Wheels as your charity of choice.

For more information, visit www.mealsonwheelsamerica.org/sharethelove.

*Disclaimer: Subaru will donate $250 for every new Subaru vehicle sold or leased from November 14, 2019, through January 2, 2020, to four national charities designated by the purchaser or lessee. Pre-approved Hometown Charities may be selected for donation depending on retailer participation. For every new Subaru vehicle sold or leased during the campaign period, participating retailers will donate a minimum of $50 in total to their registered Hometown Charities. Purchasers/lessees must make their charity designations by January 15, 2020. The four national charities will receive a guaranteed minimum donation of $250,000 each. See your local Subaru retailer for details or visit subaru.com/share. All donations made by Subaru of America, Inc.

UPS Foundation awards $5,000 grant for Meals-on-Wheels program

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels

LifeCare Alliance is the proud recipient of a $5,000 grant from the UPS Foundation to upgrade technology for the Meals-on-Wheels program.

UPS employees graciously volunteered their time for LifeCare Alliance in 2018, helping to feed hungry seniors. UPS employees participate in the corporate “Adopt-a-Route” program by covering a Meals-on-Wheels route one day per week. Each meal route delivered by a volunteer instead of a paid driver saves the Agency $12,000 annually. LifeCare Alliance qualified to apply for this funding because of the considerable contributions of local UPS employees to the Agency.

Earlier this week, LifeCare Alliance welcomed UPS employees to our Harmon Avenue location. They volunteered their time to deliver three frozen meal routes and prepare meal bags in our distribution kitchen.

Over the course of 2018, 67 volunteers delivered 1,302 meals and accumulated 208 hours of service. In addition to the Meals-on-Wheels route coverage, another local UPS employee group visits Carrie’s Café quarterly for a meeting and lunch in the morning and volunteering in the afternoon. Some from that group work in the Meals-on-Wheels distribution kitchen to assist packing the meal bags with meals, beverages, fruit, and sides. Others in the group assisted with the Senior PetCare program, breaking down food into manageable five pound bags for delivery and distribution to clients with pets. This group of volunteers gave an additional 36 hours in 2018. Overall, the UPS associates volunteered over 240 hours of their time to LifeCare Alliance, and the Agency greatly appreciates their service to our clients. As a result of UPS employees’ donating their time in this way, LifeCare Alliance became eligible to apply for funding from the corporation’s charitable arm, the UPS Foundation. We are thrilled to partner with the foundation to make capital improvements in our Meals-on-Wheels program, which will allow for increased efficiency and effectiveness.

Meals-on-Wheels provides nourishing food and a daily visit to older adults and individuals living with a medical challenge and/or disability in central Ohio. The program delivers approximately 5,000 meals a day and provides meals for children in day care and after-school programs. Individuals in these vulnerable populations often face financial, physical, and support system barriers, which put them at risk for hunger, chronic health issues, and/or social isolation. The provision of home-delivered meals addresses these barriers by providing nutritious, delicious food and socialization to clients, regardless of an individual’s ability to pay for such services. In addition to healthy food access, these clients receive health and nutrition education and linkage to community resources and other LifeCare Alliance programs to ensure that their needs are met holistically. Examples of these include the Senior PetCare program, which delivers pet food to the homes of clients and provides veterinary care to pets in need, and the Beat the Heat Fan Campaign, which supplies box fans during the hot summer months.

The overarching goal of LifeCare Alliance’s health and nutrition programs is to keep clients safe and independent in the comfort of their own homes, where they ultimately want to remain as long as possible. AARP estimates that Ohio taxpayers fund nursing home care at an average annual cost of $78,840 per person (Genworth Cost of Care Survey 2017). By serving these same individuals at home for a fraction of that cost, the Agency saves taxpayers money while serving the community. When individuals receive the appropriate nutrition levels and health assessments, potentially debilitating and costly health outcomes are prevented and circumvented.

An increasing number of employees state that being able to give back to the community is a leading factor in choosing the company for which they will work; LifeCare Alliance offers this unique volunteer program for central Ohio employers to provide this opportunity to their employees. Volunteer engagement is one of the strategies LifeCare Alliance uses to increase its organizational and programmatic effectiveness. Volunteerism promotes relationship building, community engagement, and a healthy work-life balance for employees, while giving them the opportunity to give back. The Agency has emerged as a national leader in volunteer engagement, merger collaborations, and social entrepreneurship. Because of these efforts, LifeCare Alliance is one of few nonprofits in major metropolitan areas in the country still accepting qualified clients in need without a waiting list.

We salute UPS and the UPS Foundation for the generosity of their time in helping us Nourish the Human Spirit.

UPS employees volunteer with LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program.

UPS employees load frozen meals for delivery to LifeCare Alliance Meals-on-Wheels clients.

UPS employees prepare delivery bags for LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program.

LifeCare Alliance, DAV partnership provides veterans with in-home support

By | Featured News, Help-at-Home, Meals-on-Wheels

LifeCare Alliance is proud to be in partnership with Disabled American Veterans as they provide grants to help fund our Help-at-Home program.

Help-at-Home provides personal care assistants and direct support care workers who assist with daily living activities such as bathing, fall prevention, and basic household chores. Living independently and safely in the comfort of one’s own home is a great source of joy in an older adult’s life. Help-at-Home ensures ill, elderly, and disabled individuals have adequate, clean, and safe housing. Last year alone, the program served 102 veterans in the central Ohio area.

The Disabled Americans Veterans Charitable Service Trust (DAV) has been serving veterans in America since 1920, and even has its origins in Ohio! The nonprofit was first organized by Judge Robert Marx of Cincinnati as the Disabled American Veteran of the World War (DAVWW). After the devastation that took place during World War I, Judge Marx and other organizers noticed veterans were not getting adequate care. They started the DAVWW locally, and then formed the national organization in 1921 with the purpose of “building better lives for all of our Nation’s disabled veterans and their families.”

Almost one hundred years later, the DAV continues its mission of serving veterans in need of assistance.

As a result of support from the DAV Charitable Service Trust, Help-at-Home has been able to provide continuous, ongoing services to veterans needing assistance with personal care and daily living activities. If veterans are injured or have disabilities, it is crucial to provide this safety net service which allows them to remain in their homes. Homemakers also provide a critical daily visit to these individuals, which serves as a health and well-being check-in to ensure that all of the client’s needs are met. Typically, these homebound individuals would be socially isolated if not for these visits.

Many Help-at-Home clients also receive a daily nutritional meal and visit through Meals-on-Wheels, but need additional services like the ones provided by Help-at-Home in order to continue to live a vibrant life. For example, an individual who requires a walker for mobility can get around enough to live on their own, but lack the ability to clean their bathroom efficiently without the possibility of falling. A clean living environment is vital to keeping clients healthy and safe in their own home.

Without funding partners like the DAV, LifeCare Alliance would not be able to serve our veteran neighbors with responsive, compassionate, and quality care. Thank you to the DAV for your steadfast commitment to build and strengthen the lives of our nation’s veterans!

Judge Robert Marx

Garden Product from ScottsMiracle-Gro Helps LifeCare Alliance Nourish the Human Spirit

By | Featured News, LA Catering, Meals-on-Wheels, Volunteers

For over 150 years, The ScottsMiracle-Gro Company has been contributing to the success of central Ohio’s gardens.

Recently, LifeCare Alliance was awarded garden product from this stalwart of the community in the form of:

  • 75 bags of Garden Soil
  • 25 bags of Topsoil
  • 15 bags of Mulch
  • 35 bags of Plant Food
  • 20 bags of Hummus & Manure.

Using these products in gardens located at 1699 W. Mound St. and 670 Harmon Ave. has allowed LifeCare Alliance to cultivate a number of herbs and fresh vegetables for use in our flagship dining center, Carrie’s Café, and for the Agency’s social enterprise, L.A. Catering.

For the 2019 growing season, a volunteer tends the Mound Street and Harmon Avenue gardens. Mr. Lynch has volunteered with LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program since November of 2013. Through this work, he visits elderly and homebound clients to deliver hot, nutritious meals, as well as to provide a basic wellness check. His contribution has truly helped Nourish the Human Spirit as he has devoted countless hours to the success of our gardens this growing season.

LifeCare Alliance Chef Rob Harrison and Catering Director David Imwalle estimate that the gardens have produced about 80 pounds of tomatoes thus far this season, and they are still yielding additional fruit. The Mound Street garden has also produced Brussels sprouts, carrots, scallions, and tarragon, while the Harmon Avenue garden has produced at least one pound each of parsley, cilantro, sage, basil, oregano, jalapenos, and banana peppers.

At Carrie’s Café, the herbs are used to season soups and daily entrees since fresh herbs are often more flavorful than dried. The tomatoes are added to the daily selection of salads. Clients enjoy knowing they are eating produce that was just harvested from the gardens on LifeCare Alliance property. It adds a lot to their experience of dining at Carrie’s. L.A. Catering features the tomatoes on platters of fresh vegetables, in salads, and for stir frys. All proceeds of both entities are funneled back into the Agency to continue serving clients with our core values of compassion, accountability, respect, excellence, and sustainability at the forefront.

The overall benefit of the garden project to the community has been the ability of LifeCare Alliance to continue providing healthy, delicious meals to its clients. The health and nutrition services that LifeCare Alliance provides directly contribute to an individual’s ability to remain safe and independent in the comfort of their own home. AARP estimates that Ohio taxpayers fund nursing home care at an average annual cost of $78,840 per person. By serving these same individuals at home for a fraction of that cost, LifeCare Alliance saves taxpayers money while serving the community. When individuals receive the appropriate nutrition levels and regular health assessments, potentially debilitating and costly health outcomes are prevented.

Garden product support from The ScottsMiracle-Gro Company allowed the Agency to continue to serve all clients in need, regardless of an individual’s ability to pay, while operating without a waiting list for services. By providing its own stream of revenue through social enterprise, LifeCare Alliance is securing sustainable funding for all of its programs for years to come. Thank you, ScottsMiracle-Gro!

Big Lots planning fiesta with Meals-on-Wheels clients

By | Featured News, Meals-on-Wheels

Have you ever wondered about the different ways you or your organization can support the Meals-on-Wheels program at LifeCare Alliance? Sure, there are the common ways of volunteering or sending in a donation, but could there be more?

Big Lots recently found an answer to that question. The well-known retailer already gives generously to LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels program through its charitable arm, the Big Lots Foundation, and has an active volunteer base with its employees. However, Big Lots recently came up with a new way to celebrate the clients on its corporate Meals-on-Wheels route: a Fall Fiesta!!

This October, Big Lots plans to serve tacos, margaritas, and cookies from L.A. Catering to their route clients and friends at a local senior living center. The fiesta will be filled with music, games, and possibly salsa lessons!

Why are we excited about this? It is because acts of kindness like the Fall Fiesta truly mean the world to our clients. Many of LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels recipients are homebound, isolated, have a medical condition, and/or live on an annual income of less than $20,000. In addition, older adults and medically challenged individuals are at a high risk of health and nutritional problems due to physical, mobility, medical, and support system limitations.

Fortunately, there are supporters like Big Lots who go above and beyond to show clients of Meals-on-Wheels and other LifeCare Alliance programs that they care. Through these efforts, LifeCare Alliance is able to help older adult clients stay safe, independent, and engage more with life.

Learn More

Find out more about the Big Lots Foundation here: https://www.biglots.com/corporate/community.

Want to know more about how you can support LifeCare Alliance’s Meals-on-Wheels programs? Click here or call 614-278-3130.

Need to book catering for your wedding or next corporate or social event? Click here or call 614-358-LALA.

“According to the 2015 Meals on Wheels America survey 'More Than A Meal,' 87% of seniors needing home-delivered meals are physically unable to shop for their groceries. It is often the case that, besides a caregiver, the Meals-on-Wheels deliverer is the only person that a client might interact with every day of the week.”

Camper holds a drawing labeled Camp Hamwi

Camp supporters help create lasting lessons, memories for children with diabetes

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News

Have you ever been to sleepaway camp? What was it like learning to canoe for the first time or being part of a team?

Kids with diabetes don’t always get to have these types of experiences as a result of the challenges of their illness. Rising or falling blood sugars as well as other diabetes-related complications can keep kids from exploring all that an overnight camp may have to offer. Their disease might even make them stand out among their peers, ultimately resulting in isolation or embarrassment.

The Central Ohio Diabetes Association (CODA) has been operating camps designed specifically for children with diabetes since 1968. More than 7,500 youths have attended CODA’s summer camp, Camp Hamwi (named for Dr. George Hamwi, one of the co-founders of CODA). In fact, 2019 marks the 52nd year of consecutive camp offerings for children with diabetes.

At Camp Hamwi, campers ages 7-17 learn the importance of good diabetes control in their childhood and for a lifetime. In addition to Camp Hamwi, CODA offers Stepping Stones, a transitional day camp with an overnight outing for children ages 8-12, and Kids Camp, a day camp for children ages 3-7. A special program is offered for Counselors-In-Training, ages 17 & 18, with enrollment limited to individuals entering their senior year of high school who are looking for an opportunity to develop their leadership potential.

The 2019 camp season welcomed 10 campers to Kids Camp, 15 to Stepping Stones, and 176 to Camp Hamwi. These campers represented 36 Ohio counties with an additional camper coming from Illinois and two from West Virginia. CODA was founded in 1964, and merged with LifeCare Alliance in 2017. All three camps offer education opportunities for parents and families. Kids Camp and Stepping Stones offer group counseling and support services to parents who are anxious about leaving their children on their own – perhaps for the first time since their child’s diabetes was diagnosed.

These camp experiences would not be possible without the generous support of CODA funders. The Franklin County Community Partnership Grant Program has supported CODA camps since 2013. The Community Partnership Program is a competitive grant process whereby the Franklin County Board of Commissioners support local community-based organizations that serve county residents. As a direct result of this funding, campers learn to develop a personal diabetes management plan. The plan includes:

  1. A healthy meal plan.
  2. Regular physical exercise.
  3. Regular checks of blood glucose levels.
  4. Taking diabetes medications as prescribed.

The camp programming also helps children and parents learn about each element of the plan and to start practicing such positive behaviors as goal setting, self-monitoring, positive reinforcement, and shared responsibility for diabetes management. Eighty-six campers came from Franklin County this summer.

Similarly, the Ingram-White Castle Foundation has been supporting LifeCare Alliance and CODA camps for many years. The Foundation especially supports programs that address a critical human service need. Without this key support, CODA would not be able to provide scholarships for the nearly 200 campers that attend each summer. While the camp programs are designed primarily to promote the health of children with diabetes throughout their lifetime and to prevent the development of diabetes complications, they also teach self-care skills and help the participants develop confidence through appropriate medically supervised recreational activities. Most participants cite making new acquaintances with peers with whom they can share experiences and overcome feelings of isolation, fear, and anger as a valuable tool in helping them better manage their disease. Learning to manage diabetes helps ultimately prepare the campers for success in all aspects of life like school and work, which links to another area of emphasis for the Ingram-White Castle Foundation’s funding program.

Another funder without which CODA camps would not be possible is the New Venture Fund, which assists with CODA’s long-standing goal that no child with diabetes be turned away from having a camp experience because of their family’s economic situation.

For children who develop diabetes at a young age, it is crucial that they learn self-care skills such as blood sugar testing, insulin injections and the importance of adhering to diet and exercise regimens. Camp Hamwi offers diverse recreational programs for any skill level. The camp provides opportunities to develop team spirit and good sportsmanship in individual and group activities. Each camper is encouraged to try new activities and explore their individual interests.  It is important that campers explore “new territory” by focusing more upon their potential than on imagined limitations imposed by diabetes. There are supervised opportunities for horseback riding, archery, volleyball, soccer, basketball, canoeing, swimming, rappelling, campfires, and arts and crafts. This funding is crucial in allowing diabetic kids to achieve their full potential as they learn how to manage their illness.

All of CODA’s camps are accredited by the American Camp Association (ACA). This accreditation means that the camp maintains the highest professional standards in instruction, safety, and welfare for all campers. To maintain accreditation, the camp must meet or exceed standards in more than 300 areas. In recent years, the camping program has adapted to meet the needs of both campers and staff members who use insulin pumps. As the devices have increased in popularity and usage, approximately half of the campers and staff benefit from case-specific educational programs.

The Harry C. Moores Foundation, a longtime CODA camp funder, is located in Columbus, Ohio, and supports camps in order to make an impact in child welfare throughout the state. Many campers come from rural counties in Ohio where they might be the only student at their school with diabetes. Meeting other kids that also need to use an insulin pump or give themselves injections can be life-changing for those who are isolated by their condition. One camper, Katie, remarked about this topic, “You don’t have to think about having diabetes; it’s just the norm. You don’t have to apologize for being diabetic because they know what it’s like.” Helping kids ages 3-17 attend camp at little-to-no cost to their families is invaluable.

After camp ends, like it did this year on Aug. 3, staff complete a thorough outcome evaluation with campers and families to determine program and education components for the next year. Continuous quality improvement allows the program to better meet expressed education needs and adapt to requests among the participants. The camp education program has three focus areas: hypoglycemia awareness and treatment, bullying, and carb counting.

The CVS Health Foundation, another camp funder, is a great example of a corporate philanthropy program that helps campers take advantage of the camp curriculum to help better manage their disease. The Diabetes Camp Education Curriculum addresses every aspect of diabetes care including medical and psychosocial concerns.  There are three levels of curriculum: Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced. Daily education sessions are led by the medical staff of physicians, nurses, and dietitians who focus on teaching about the nature of diabetes and methods of managing it. The complexity of issues related to diabetes dictate a relatively high ratio of medical staff to campers (no less than one health professional to eight campers). This ratio is significantly higher than many diabetes camps. The medical coverage at Camp Hamwi ensures that any medical issues that arise will be addressed by qualified medical staff rather than by counselors or non-medical personnel.

A licensed social worker conducts psychosocial programs designed to increase self-esteem and feelings of empowerment. These learning opportunities promote attitudes of independence and self-reliance crucial to the tight control of diabetes that leads to the reduction of death and disability due to diabetes or its complications.  These programs reinforce the work of the medical staff by enhancing commitment to systematic self-care and the level of glycemic control that leads to a full and healthy (near normal) lifestyle.

Thank you so much to all of our funders for making CODA camps so successful in 2019!

Camp Hamwi campers thanking longtime CODA funder, the Harry C. Moores Foundation.

CODA Director Cathy Paessun, left, and Dayna McCrary, community partnerships coordinator for the Franklin County Board of Commissioners, pose during the 2019 Red Carpet Day at Camp Hamwi after a tour of the grounds specifically designed for grantors and funders.

ADAMH Mini-Grant Program Supports Carrie’s Cafe

By | Carrie's Cafe, Featured News
LifeCare Alliance is excited to announce a $1,500 mini-grant from the Alcohol, Drug and Mental Health Board of Franklin County. This grant supports “Live Well with Carrie’s,” an initiative that provides Carrie’s Cafe, our signature dining center, with special events and enriching programming.

Special events are a key component of LifeCare Alliance’s congregate dining center program, which serves older adults and individuals living with a medical challenge and/or disability at 43 locations across central Ohio. Meal sites address clients’ nutritional, health-related, mental, and psychological needs holistically. They provide a nutritious meal, socialization, enriching programming, health services, and educational opportunities under one roof. Culturally diverse offerings are available at 11 Asian and Somali restaurants.

LifeCare Alliance is the largest provider of senior meals through community dining centers in both central Ohio and the state, according to the Ohio Department of Aging. Dining centers promote successful aging among central Ohioans, which is defined as the avoidance of disease and disability, maintenance of high cognitive and physical functioning, and engagement with life. In 2018, the congregate dining program served 140,436 meals to 4,496 clients. Seventy-eight percent (78%) of senior dining center clients are age 65 or older, 90% have an annual income of less than $20,000, 64% are female, and 55% are minority. Read More

Nominate a Volunteer for the LifeCare Alliance Spirit Awards!

By | Carrie's Cafe, Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Columbus Cancer Clinic, Events, Featured News, Help-at-Home, Meals-on-Wheels, POHC, Volunteers, Wellness
Thank you for nominating an outstanding volunteer for the Spirit Awards! Volunteers are essential to the success of LifeCare Alliance in our community, so it is important to recognize the wonderful work they do.
Please use the form below to submit your nomination. We want to know the LifeCare Alliance program that benefits from your nominee’s work, as well as the reasons your nominee stands out from all the rest.
Please visit LifeCare Alliance’s website and social media for information about volunteer recognition events as details are finalized. If you are interested in attending, please be sure to indicate so on the form below. Thank you!
Home repair Client

LifeCare Alliance, partners help secure Army widow’s home

By | Featured News, Home Repairs

LifeCare Alliance, in partnership with Meals on Wheels America and The Home Depot Foundation, helped provide basic but vital safety improvements at an Army widow’s home.

When 75-year-old Isabelle contacted LifeCare Alliance for home repairs, she was grateful to learn of the help she could receive through the Helping Hometown Heroes program. Most of the repairs to Isabelle’s home were to keep her safe and secure in her own home.  The improvements included the installation of motion-activated outdoor lighting, a small wheelchair ramp, a new security door, a window with locking device, and drywall in her bedroom.

“I really appreciate the motion lamp. When I come home at night, the light turns on,” Isabelle said, adding that she feels safer with the new wheelchair ramp and a window that locks. “You guys have helped me tremendously, and I appreciate it,” she said.

Isabelle said the improvements have allowed her to stay safe and independent in her home, where she wants to be. The repairs, unfortunately, had been more than she could afford.

Her husband, served in the Army during the 1960s and ’70s.

The Helping Hometown Heroes program helps veterans and spouses improve their homes to address mobility challenges and avoid unnecessary injuries, hospitalization and homelessness. The Home Depot Foundation has invested more than $200 million in veteran-related projects since 2011.

“I would like to thank the Home Depot Foundation and LifeCare Alliance for all they do for our veterans,” Isabelle said.

Man cooling down in the water

What You Should Know About Heat Exhaustion and Heat Stroke

By | Featured News, Wellness

LifeCare Alliance has a team of registered nurses and registered dietitians on staff, providing wellness services to the central Ohio community. 

During the summer, seniors are among the most vulnerable populations when it comes to heat stroke and heat exhaustion. Our Columbus Foundation fellow, Radhika Pandit, explains the two conditions and how LifeCare Alliance can be of service.

Heat Exhaustion vs. Heat Stroke

Radhika PanditThere are two main types of heat-related illnesses:

  • Heat exhaustion occurs when the body overheats and becomes dehydrated. Symptoms include profuse sweating, dizziness, and nausea.
  • Heat stroke results from untreated heat exhaustion that has reached a critical stage. Symptoms become more severe and one may stop sweating completely due to extreme dehydration.

If you suspect someone is experiencing heat exhaustion or heat stroke, call 911 immediately.

Who is at a Higher Risk for Heat-Related Illnesses?

Older adults are at higher risk because they commonly take medications or have medical conditions that affect their body’s ability to regulate heat.

“Seniors need to be more mindful of their environment and take more preventative measures,” said LifeCare Alliance nurse Peggy Parisot, MSN, RN.

How Can I Prevent Heat-Related Illnesses?

In order to prevent heat-related illnesses, follow these tips from Nurse Peggy!

  • Avoid exposure to outdoor heat during the hottest periods of the day, generally 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.
  • Stay well-hydrated on hot days.
  • Wear light, layered clothing.
  • Avoid consuming alcohol because it causes rapid dehydration.
  • Wear a hat and sunscreen in the sun.
  • Look out for others and notice if they’re expressing symptoms of heat exhaustion.

Beat the Heat Fan Campaign

Living in a house without air conditioning can leave you vulnerable to heat exhaustion or heat stroke during the hot summer months.

If you are in need of a fan to cool down your house, join us during a fan distribution day. Fans are distributed at LifeCare Alliance’s Harmon Avenue facility (670 Harmon Ave). Call the Fan Hotline at 614-437-2870 for information on the next distribution event!

Learn more

Click here to visit the Wellness Department page and get information on available services and wellness center locations.

Diabetes testing tools

Understanding the Basics of Diabetes

By | Central Ohio Diabetes Association, Featured News

LifeCare Alliance offers diabetes management education through its wellness program and the Central Ohio Diabetes Association. We can assist with blood sugar testing, corporate events, meal planning, and much more.

When it comes to understanding diabetes, there are some basics that should be covered. Our Columbus Foundation fellow, Radhika Pandit, explains what diabetes is and some ways patients can live their best life with it.

What is Diabetes?

Radhika PanditDiabetes is a chronic disease that affects the insulin produced by your pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that is extremely important in maintaining proper blood glucose (sugar) levels. Insulin is released into the bloodstream following a meal to stimulate the uptake of the glucose in your meal into the cells to be utilized for energy. If this hormone is not working properly, glucose is trapped in the bloodstream, blood sugar levels spike, and cells are deprived of energy.

What is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2?

There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2.

  • Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks and destroys its own insulin-producing pancreatic cells. Patients require insulin therapy.
  • Type 2 diabetes results when the body starts to become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type 2 tends to present later in life, although it is becoming increasingly common for children to present with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 in children can be influenced by family history, genetics, eating habits, physical activity and maintaining a healthy weight.

Diabetes can lead to a range of complications if not properly managed. These include peripheral nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy), eye disease (glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy), and kidney failure.

How Can I Manage Type 2 Diabetes?

In order to manage your type 2 diabetes, make sure to follow these 5 tips!

  • Transition to a more plant-based diet: Incorporate more fruits and vegetables into your meals and limit processed foods and sugary drinks
  • Exercise regularly: At least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week
  • Take your diabetes medication as directed by your physician
  • Monitor your blood glucose levels regularly
  • Schedule regular doctor’s visits

Learn more

Click here to visit the Central Ohio Diabetes Association page and get information on diabetes, available services, and upcoming events.